Current Research

I am involved in the SNO+ experiment located in Sudbury, Canada. The goal of this experiment is to observe neutrinoless double-beta-decay, which would mean neutrinos are their own antiparticles. However, this experiment can also measure neutrinos coming from following sources:

I am also trying to develop a new geoneutrino experiment to be located in SUSEL.

I am looking for undergraduates, graduates, and postdocs. If you are interested please contact me ntolich@u.washington.edu


Biographical Sketch

In 1999 I received my M.Sc. from the University of Auckland working with Prof. Paul Barker. My thesis was a precise measurement of the 14N+p→14O+n threshold, which is an important parameter in determining the first element of the CKM matrix based on superallowed beta decay FT values.

In 2005 I received my Ph.D. from Stanford University working with Prof. Giorgio Gratta on the KamLAND experiment. My thesis was a first measurement of neutrinos originating from the Earth, referred to as geoneutrinos. This work combined with an independent analysis performed by Sanshiro Enomoto was published in Nature and received significant press.

Following my Ph.D. I did a postdoc at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with Kevin Lesko. I was involved in many aspects of analysis of the NCD data from the SNO experiment, including the extraction of the number of neutrinos observed from the Sun.



Publications


Talks

Colloquia, seminars, and invited talks

Contributed talks


Press

Mentioned or quoted in the press

Geoneutrino result, July 27, 2005


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